NIF/SHATIL Social Justice Fellowships

About the Social Justice Fellowships

The NIF/SHATIL Social Justice Fellowships enable a cadre of post-college Jewish young adults to spend 10 months immersed in the movement for social change in Israel.

The Experience

These Fellowships, which include a modest stipend, place young Jewish activists in Israeli non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for a year of in-depth contribution and learning. Additionally, Fellows engage in monthly enrichment programs and periodic site visits to further develop their understanding of Israel, Israeli activism, and their role as activists both in Israel and at home. Fellows spend the year with an organization working in one of the following areas:

  • Safeguarding civil and human rights
  • Pursuing environmental justice
  • Promoting Jewish-Arab equality
  • Advancing the status of women
  • Fostering tolerance and religious pluralism
  • Bridging social and economic gaps
Additionally, Fellows engage in monthly enrichment programs and periodic site visits to further develop their understanding of Israel, Israeli activism, and their role as activists both in Israel and at home. Fellows also receive training in leadership and community development. Because Fellows intern full time in an Israeli NGO, successful applicants must have either excellent Hebrew language skills, or good Hebrew with excellent Arabic skills

Requirements

Applicants must be college graduates by the start of the fellowship. Since Fellows intern full time in an Israeli NGO, successful applicants must have either excellent Hebrew language skills, or very good Hebrew with strong Arabic skills.

The Fellowship year runs from September 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015. Completed applications are due January 20, 2014. For more information, visit www.nif.org/sjfellowships or contact Jessica Simon at fellowships@nif.org or 202-513-7870.

About the New Israel Fund and SHATIL

The New Israel Fund (NIF) was established in 1979 to strengthen democracy and promote social justice in Israel, and is today Israel’s foremost social-change institution.  Specifically, it works to advance the following objectives: Fighting for civil and human rights; Promoting religious tolerance and pluralism; Closing the social and economic gaps in Israeli society; and Protecting Israel’s environment.

Since its founding, NIF has granted more than $200 million to more than 800 Israeli non-profit organizations.  But NIF is far more than a grant maker; NIF is a unique working and philanthropic partnership of North Americans, Israelis, and Europeans, providing more than 1,300 Israeli non-profit organizations with financial and technical support each year.

In 1982, NIF established SHATIL, the New Israel Fund’s Empowerment and Training Center for Social Change Organizations in Israel. SHATIL builds organizational capacity of NIF grantees and similar organizations by providing training, consultation, coalition-building assistance, and other services.

Filed under Israel, Opportunities

2 Responses to “NIF/SHATIL Social Justice Fellowships”

  1. I’d like to congratulate this progressive org for getting the idea that workers should be ‘paid’.

    However I’m bothered by the fact that this program is geared to only Jewish young adults and not anyone else, more particularly Arab young adults.

    Imagine a program that seeks to, for example, reduce discrimination against Arabs, that itself discriminates against Arabs. You don’t have to imagine-here it is.


    Dave Boxthorn · October 18th, 2013 at 3:32 pm
  2. Woops, I just noticed-while you say this fellowship is for ‘Jewish young adults’ the program website doesn’t mention the term. What gives?

    OTOH reading the NIF website it shows that a person with excellent Hebrew language skills but no Arabic language skills would be acceptable, but someone with excellent Arabic language skills but no Hebrew language skills wouldn’t.

    What a sneaky way to discriminate against Arabs.


    Dave Boxthorn · October 18th, 2013 at 3:42 pm

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