• “Four large U.S. Jewish groups have lent support to Turkey’s position in opposing the passage of two resolutions pending in Congress that call for official recognition of World War I-era killings of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire as genocide.” When Jews deny other people’s holocausts for the sake of Israel’s foreign relations, something is truly awry.
  • Psychology Today: “We tend to believe our political views have evolved by a process of rational thought, as we consider arguments, weigh evidence, and draw conclusions. But the truth is more complicated. Our political preferences are equally the result of factors we’re not aware of—such as how educated we are, how scary the world seems at a given moment, and personality traits that are first apparent in early childhood. Among the most potent motivators, it turns out, is fear.”
  • “Hadassah national president June Walker said this week that her recent appointment to head the Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations marks a new era for the status of women within Jewish organizations. ‘Women have finally arrived in the Jewish world where their intelligence and activities are regarded in the same light as men,’ she said. ‘Equality [within Jewish organizations] is now based on capability and not sex.'”
  • “A Jewish caucus has been set up within Germany’s centre-left Social Democratic Party (SPD), the first Jewish organization within a major German party since the Nazi takeover in 1933, a report Thursday said.”
  • “Tel Aviv hopes to set up a ‘walk of fame’ similar to that in Hollywood on one of the city’s main streets in time for its 100th anniversary in 2009, the Ma’ariv daily reported Thursday.”
  • So hareidim aren’t the only ones: “A protest by two opposing groups of Cambodian Buddhist monks has ended in a fist fight on the streets of the Cambodian capital, leaving at least one monk hurt.”
  • “With threats to the Jewish people emanating from so many directions – a nuclear Iran, the demographic challenges of American Jewry, the rise in anti-Semitic attacks around the world – a succession of leaders has warned that Jews face as much peril today as on the eve of the Holocaust. But when the Center for Jewish Studies at Queens College in New York City convened a conference this week on the state of world Jewry – ominously titled ‘Is it 1938 again?’ – the consensus was a resounding ‘No.'”