Repentance shouldn’t be about wallowing in guilt.  In his sermon last night, my rabbi spoke about this at length.  It’s something I’ve thought about before, and it really speaks to me.
These days I’m pretty much never at synagogue.  Back when I was at school (I’m currently taking a year off), I participated in the Chavurah minyan each week, which I loved.  But here, I find that praying congregation-style just doesn’t do it for me.  And last night I realized for the first time that one of my personal sources of guilt on Yom Kippur comes from actually being at synagogue, precisely because I’m so rarely there.  I feel guilt for not being more a part of the community.  Guilt for being so unfamiliar with the liturgy.  Guilt that my Hebrew is so bad.  Guilt for not truly feeling that the path to repentance involves asking for permission to repent.
So, like last year at Brown, I didn’t go to services today, albeit for slightly different reasons.  I’m at home, on my own.  Here I can observe Yom Kippur guilt-free, thinking about ways in which I can repent for me, myself, and I.  My lack of belief in G()d in the traditional sense of an entity or concept that has at least some manifest control of my life or the world leads me to understand that I repent for my own benefit, and for that of those around me.  Repenting helps me become a better person.  I take responsibility for my flaws, my problems, my errors, and I ask those around me to understand them, and join with me as I try to grow past them.  That growth might involve additional involvement with the community.  Or it might not.
This approach to observance is a source of conflict with my family, who feel strongly that going to shul is a family operation.  And while I respect the desire to observe the day together, I can’t subvert my feelings on what it means for me to be a Jew to the family’s feelings on what it means to be a Jewish family.  The same holds for a congregation.  Yom Kippur is too important for me to follow anyone’s patterns of observance but my own.  I’m sure that those patterns will continue to change, and as they do, I’ll do my best to understand and remain true to them.