Just a couple weeks ago, Haaretz covered the uplifting and incredible energy behind the #JewishResistance movement. Israel’s largest left-leaning publication detailed IfNotNow’s thousands-strong coast-to-coast protests against Bannon and the occupation, the mom and daughter team behind the 3,000+ person campaign to get the Jewish federations to say anything about what’s going on, and Bend the Arc’s political actions to fight Trump.
Included among those amazing activists, Haaretz called Jewschool “the Jewish resistance’s unofficial organ.” We bear that title with pride — we’ve been the loudest media source unabashedly championing the work of all these campaigns and more. Over the past few months, we’ve helped cover, interview, boost, tweet, share, and make noise about these inspiring campaigns days, weeks, and even months before bigger news sources even noticed.
That’s Jewschool’s mission — that’s what we do best. Our mission is “to connect and broadcast grassroots Jewish activists and thinkers dissatisfied with the status quo.” After relaunching just a couple years ago, you can see that we’ve been there as a soapbox for important bottom-up progressive change within American Jewry.
It makes me terribly proud. Here’s the article and here’s what we said:

“The Jewish community is being uncharacteristically silent on some of the hate out of Trump’s associates, and uncharacteristically quiet on instances of anti-Semitism. It’s a shonda,” said Ben Murane, using the Yiddish word for shame. Murane is a senior editor at Jewschool, which is the Jewish Resistance’s unofficial organ. “I am baffled often why they are so vocal on other issues like U.N. resolutions and yet so silent on Bannon, the architect of Breitbart,” he said.
“Federations are stuck in an old model, they’re not touching young people,” Murane told Haaretz. “These are the kids who joined federation young adult groups. Then they wanted their institution to reflect their voices. But when they mobilized and reached out they were immediately rebuffed,” said Murane, who lives in Toronto.