Culture, Identity, Israel, Politics

יהי זכרנם לברכה yehi zikhronam li'vrakhah May their Memories be a Blessing


David Berger (weightlifter)
Ze’ev Friedman (weightlifter)
Yossef Gutfreund (wrestling referee)
Eliezer Halfin (wrestler)
Yossef Romano (weightlifter)
Amitzur Shapira (track coach)
Kehat Shorr (shooting coach)
Mark Slavin (wrestler)
Andre Spitzer (fencing coach)
Yakov Springer (weightlifting judge)
Moshe Weinberg (wrestling coach)

15 thoughts on “יהי זכרנם לברכה yehi zikhronam li'vrakhah May their Memories be a Blessing

  1. Why does everyone leave out Anton Fliegerbauer (German police officer)? who died during the rescue attempt?

  2. I think because he was killed in the line of duty, and was not targeted as an innocent civilian in the olympic village.

  3. I’m glad there won’t be a moment of silence at the Olympics.
    The Olympics are for celebration, not for a memorial.

  4. @Jonathan1 Yes, a time for celebrating the international spirit of the Olympics… for which these were murdered… at said Olympics… 40 years ago… and have never been commemorated at said Olympics… If they were athletes from any other country I’d feel less of a personal connection but no differently about the need for commemoration.

  5. Ok.
    What is so unique that it was 40 years ago? Should there just be a permanent moment of silence every Olympics for the Israelis murdered?
    Btw., plenty of American soldiers were killed by the British in the War of 1812, which was 200 years ago. And those British soldiers were taking orders from a government sitting in said London. And the Olympics have never had a moment of silence about American soldiers killed by the British.
    Should we demand a moment of silence for the American soldiers killed by the British 200 years ago?

    1. Jonathan1 writes:
      What is so unique that it was 40 years ago?
      At the 20th and 30th anniversaries, there was no Facebook.

  6. Jonathan
    The wars fought are not part of the Olympics. The soldiers fighting those wars were not participating in the Olympics nor the embodiment of its ideals. The Israeli athletes were, not because they were Israeli, but because they were Olympic Athletes. They were murdered in the course of competing in the Olympics and for 40 years the IOC has refused to honor their memory publicly. Their widows would like for them to do so before they die. Yes, there should be a permanent moment of silence for ALL members of the Olympic family who have died in pursuit of its ideals, especially those who were killed during the games for reasons that run counter to those ideals.

  7. Ok. We just disagree.
    the IOC has refused to honor their memory publicly. Their widows would like for them to do so before they die.
    What their widows really would like is for their husbands not to have died in 1972.
    That’s the justice they seek, but that kind of justice doesn’t exist in this world . . . . maybe in the next world.

  8. Jonathan
    The widows have accepted the death of their husbands with more dignity and grace than the IOC has accepted the need to honor those same men for their commitment to the Olympic spirit. The widows surely would have wished their husbands to be alive today cheering on their fellow athletes. Since that is not possible, they want an acknowledgement from the IOC that their horrible murder was not for naught, that their memories can serve as a testament to the spirit of the games.
    In refusing to memorialize them publicly, the IOC demeans and cheapens their death. You do the same thing when you cite ludicrous and irrelevant arguments about soldiers in the War of 1812 in comparison to this event.
    They were people, athletes and the circumstances of their murder made them symbols. Their memory should stand as a lesson to the world for the dignity of the spirit of humanity, silent and public.

  9. they want an acknowledgement from the IOC that their horrible murder was not for naught
    Ironically, their murder was indeed for naught
    (Unless we view it from the perspective of Palestinian nationalism, in which case their murder arguably furthered the goals of putting the PLO on the map.)
    What exactly do you think they died for? A moment of silence in the London Olympics 40 years after their death, when none of the athletes at London were even alive in 1972?

    1. הזכה שבתפילות אותנו לא תחזיר
      מי אשר כבה נרו ובעפר נטמן
      בכי מר לא יעירו, לא יחזירו לכאן
      (And that includes moments of silence.)

  10. Enough Jonathon, you’re just being provocative. Yes, in a strange way, unless the IOC acknowledges and memorializes their death, it was indeed for naught. No, a moment of silence does not bring them back and it does not make anything better. Yes, you’re right, they died at the hands of terrorists seeking to raise the banner of their cause. But the means do not justify the ends, the Olympics are intended to diminish bloodshed not become through means for it, and when that happens it should be acknowledged and to refuse to do so says a great deal about the organizers. Sof davar.

  11. Enough Jonathon, you’re just being provocative.
    Ironically, I’m giving my opinion.
    Yes, in a strange way, unless the IOC acknowledges and memorializes their death, it was indeed for naught.
    Actually, I disagree with you. In my provocative opinion, those deaths were for naught even if the IOC acknowledges and memorializes those death.
    No, a moment of silence does not bring them back and it does not make anything better.
    I guess we agree after all then.
    Yes, you’re right, they died at the hands of terrorists seeking to raise the banner of their cause.
    Ironically, this is what I wrote above:
    “Unless we view it from the perspective of Palestinian nationalism, in which case their murder arguably furthered the goals of putting the PLO on the map.)”
    Sof davar.
    Actually, just because Adam Davis writes that something is “Sof davar” does not mean that an argument is over.

  12. “they want an acknowledgement from the IOC that their horrible murder was not for naught.”
    It was for naught folks. That’s what crazy ass murder is ‘for.’ Nothing.

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